Have a look at the CO2, water temperature and salinity data from in the different parts of the ocean around the world:
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CO2: An unprecedented circumnavigation of high quality CO2 data in 80 days. I think this has never been done before. That is a great testimony to the instrument that it survived a very bumpy ride! The atmospheric concentration is about 410 ppm, so that when ever the seawater CO2 concentration is lower, the CO2 goes into the ocean, and vice verse. We see the high CO2 around the equator in the Atlantic where CO2 rich water from below comes to the surface. We see low CO2 in most places in the Southern Ocean where Boris sailed during summer, and the season for phytoplankton to bloom (the suck the CO2 out of the water to grow). Particularly low on the Falkland Plateau, one of the most productive areas.
In the north Atlantic we see low CO2 for the track going north, likely related to cooling of the water during winter. The higher CO2 in the same general area going south is maybe related to the tropical storm that might have brought up high CO2 water from below. In the area west of Cape Horn, the CO2 is high even though this is summer growing season; this is likely related to a lack of micro-nutrients (iron) that prevent intensive blooms.
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Salinity: The Atlantic has the highest salinity, and the south Pacific is low. Close to the equator the salinity is low again, also in the Atlantic, and that is typical for the doldrums where there is a lot or rain that dilutes the surface water. Southeast of Africa we see the quick variability of salinity because of the high salinity Aguhlas.
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Temperature:
No big surprises that the tropics is warmer than the Southern Ocean. Again, we see the influence of the warm Agulhas current south of Africa where it is much warmer for the same latitude than in the rest of the Southern Ocean.
Salinity and temperature is needed to determine the solubility of CO2 (and all other gases) in water, and is therefore critical to know for the CO2 data.

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